Innovative Financing for Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) in Asia-Pacific Region

Innovative Financing for Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) in Asia-Pacific Region

ECCE is among the most underfunded sectors in many developing countries. This situation is against the research evidence that quality ECCE can contribute to children’s holistic development and their future productivity and that investment in ECCE is considered one of the most cost-effective strategies because earlier intervention requires fewer resources and less effort. The international community pledged the realization of access of all children to quality ECCE as one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals: Target 4.2 “By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and pre-primary education so that they are ready for primary education”.

This regional study was launched to provide policy-makers in Asia and the Pacific with innovative practices and policy options for financing and partnerships for ECCE. The study analyzes the financing of the ECCE sector in selected Asia-Pacific countries with different governance models, and document innovative financing schemes and partnerships for ECCE within and outside Asia and the Pacific. This project is carried out by UNESCO Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education (UNESCO Bangkok), in collaboration with the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA) and Kobe University, and with the financial support from the Government of the Republic of Korea. The details of the study are as follows:

  • The selected countries from each sub-region: Japan, Mongolia and Republic of Korea from East Asia; Indonesia and Vietnam from Southeast Asia; Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka from South and West Asia; the Kyrgyz Republic from Central Asia; Fiji from the Pacific.
  • The object of the study: the pre-primary age of early childhood, usually 3 years of age until the age to start primary education, usually either at age 5 or 6 depending on the country.
  • The areas of the study: including health, nutrition, water and sanitation, education and social protection, all of which interrelatedly contribute to young children’s holistic development.
  • The stakeholders which the study focus on: diverse governmental sectors and agencies at the central and decentralized levels; the private sector including families, communities, non-governmental organizations and companies as well as international cooperation agencies. 

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